DIRECT ANTERIOR HIP ARTHROPLASTY

The Direct Anterior Hip Arthroplasty is another approach to hip replacement that produces effective and dramatic relief for adult patients suffering from severe arthritis of the hip. This hip replacement procedure provides recovery and return-to-lifestyle benefits that may not be as easily obtained with other surgical approaches for hip replacement.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TRADITIONAL TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT AND THE DIRECT ANTERIOR HIP ARTHROPLASTY?

In traditional hip replacement surgery, an incision is made along the posterior aspect of the thigh and buttocks. The posterior approach typically requires detachment of muscle and soft tissues, which are repaired, and inc-ludes a longer rehabilitation period by about 2-4 weeks. Furthermore, with the posterior approach, hip dislocation precautions are necessary to reduce the risk of the ball dislocating from the socket. This means the patient must avoid crossing their legs or flexing the hip beyond 90 degrees for about 6-12 weeks.

The Direct Anterior Approach for hip replacement tries to spare the posterior muscles and soft tissue from transection (although they may not be completely spared) allowing for the limited restrictions see with the other approaches and their slightly longer recovery.

Through an anterior incision, Dr. Shapiro is able to access the hip joint without dividing or detaching any muscles in the front of the hip and limiting the injury to the posterior muscles. Hip dislocation precautions are typically no longer necessary.

Dr. Shapiro accurately positions the hip replacement components using intra-operative X-ray. Dr. Shapiro doesn’t need to use a special surgical table.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS
TO THE ANTERIOR APPROACH?

  • May allow accelerated recovery time because key muscles are not detached during the operation.
  • Potential for fewer restrictions during the first 6-12 weeks of recovery.
  • May allow reduced scarring because the technique allows for one relatively small incision.
  • Since the incision is on the front side of the leg, the patient may be spared from the pain of sitting on scar tissue.
  • Less risk of dislocation.
    There may be less pain, meaning less pain medication.
  • Potential for earlier resumption of work, recreation and activities of daily living. This will need to be discussed with Dr. Shapiro

WHAT ARE THE RISKS TO HAVING HIP REPLACEMENT SURGERY?

Every surgical approach has risks and benefits. The performance of a hip replacement depends on age, weight, activity level and other factors. There are potential risks, and recovery takes time.